Above & Beyond Community Garden free for the taking


Above & Beyond is once again offering free, homegrown produce to the community for the taking. Look for this sign and the tent in the parking lot at the corner of E. First Street and Main Street on Tuesdays and Thursdays.
By: 
Kim Brooks
Express Editor

     For the past four years, Above & Beyond Home Health and Hospice has been offering the community a free produce garden. Starting Tuesday, July 14, several items will be available for the taking.

     This spring, volunteers and staff with Above & Beyond planted a multitude of produce:

     • Beans

     • Tomatoes

     • Peppers

     • Broccoli

     • Cauliflower

     • Lettuce

     • Cucumbers

     • And much more

     “The garden has been well taken care of,” shared Diane Gray with Above & Beyond. People have been weeding, watering, and adding mulch.

     The community garden is free for the taking. Above & Beyond just asks that you take only what you need

     The free produce will be available for the taking on just Tuesdays and Thursdays. Look for the tent and banner in the parking lot at the corner of E. First Street and Main Street, across from Above & Beyond.

     “We’ll have coolers with the produce inside,” said Gray.

     There will also be disposable gloves available for the public to wear while choosing their lot, in an effort to protect everyone from the spread of COVID-19. You are also encouraged to wash the produce once you get home.

     In addition to growing produce for the taking, a few people have also been assisting in the community garden effort.

     “People have also donated plants and vegetables,” praised Gray.

     Cindy Bagge, Jan Byers, and Julie Vacek have contributed by adding to the supply, tilling, and donating tomato cages for the garden.

     “People can continue to donate any vegetables from their own gardens if they have extras,” encouraged Gray.

     You can contact Above & Beyond to do so.

     “This project is all about promoting healthy eating,” continued Gray.

     The produce is available to anyone in the Monticello community, no matter their income level.

     “We really don’t want these to go to waste,” urged Gray.

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